Lookout: Landscape in change

 

A new visitors centre at Garzweiler opencast mine

Panoramic view over the Garzweil opencast mine Copyright: Institute of Landscape Architecture

A visitor centre with a lookout point near the opencast mine of Garzweiler is the proposed project theme.

Contact

Phone

work
+49 241 80 95052

Email

E-Mail

Contact

Name

Frank Lohrberg

Lehrstuhlleitung

Phone

work
+49 241 80 95050

Email

E-Mail
 

The idea of such an architectural intervention, which should be located directly on the edge of the opencast mine between Jackerath and Erkelenz, originates from the wish of the municipalities themselves (the municipality of Titz in particular) and the Zweckverband Tagebaufolgelandschaft Garzweiler. Aim of the new building should be to make the last mining activity visible and “experienceable” for the visitors before the epochal change of the region will occur: the final end of lignite mining.

The opencast lignite mine activities in the Rhineland district have received a lot of attention in recent months due to the protests surrounding the Hambacher Forest. This negative media aura around the open "holes" unfortunately overshadows the interesting debate about the landscape planning development after the end of the mining. For years, the original agricultural landscape has been strongly transformed by the opencast mining activities and deformed beyond recognition. The landscapes of recultivation, as a reinterpretation and reconstruction of the landscape after mining, open up new possibilities for the development of this region.

The Rhineland district lies between the very dynamic urban region of the Rhine and the cities of Aachen and Mönchengladbach. Here a progressive population growth is expected in the coming years (partly at the expense of the neighbouring rural areas). The artificial lakes of the Rhenish district, which will be created after the end of opencast mining, should in future represent an ideal recreational area and a new "green heart" of the region.

These medium to long-term landscape changes should be taken into account by designing the new visitor centre on the edge of the Garzweiler opencast mine, so that the architecture itself can become part of the process and, as one of the first concrete action, could represent a kind of landmark in space and time.

Co-examiner: Carolin Stapenhorst, Juniorprofessor of “Tool Cultures”

Dates:

  • 9th April: Seminar - Site Visit
  • 7th May: in-depth study presentation
  • 14th May: In-between presentation
  • 4th June: In-between presentation
  • 25th June: In-between presentation